test

The Japanese Hayabusa-2 spacecraft is thought to have detonated an explosive charge on the asteroid it is exploring.

Its mission is to create an artificial crater on the asteroid Ryugu.

If this is successful, it will later return to gather samples of the asteroid, which could help scientists understand how earth was formed in the early solar system.

According to Kyodo News, the experiment’s success will only be confirmed in late April.

The explosive device, called the Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI), was deployed by the Hayabusa-2 on Friday. The SCI is a 14kg conical container attached to the Hayabusa-2 and packed with plastic explosive.

It was intended to punch a 10m-wide hole in the asteroid upon impact.

The SCI on Friday successfully separated from the Hayabusa-2 at an altitude of 500m above the surface of Ryugu.

In the meantime, the Hayabusa-2 manoeuvred itself to hide away on the other side of the asteroid, shielding the spacecraft from any flying debris.

If the detonation is successful, images of the moment it happened should be captured by a small camera called DCAM3, which was deployed by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa).

The camera is meant to observe the explosion from a distance of about 1km and capture images of the projectile explosion back to its “mothership”.

However, it is unclear how long it would take for these images to be transmitted back to Earth.

If all goes to plan, Hayabusa-2 will in a few weeks return to the crater to collect pristine samples of the asteroid that have not been exposed to the harsh environment of space.

These samples are expected to reveal vital data to help explain how planets were formed in the early period of the solar system.

  • Movie shows moment of asteroid landing
  • Asteroid mission exploring a ‘rubble pile’
  • Metal world ‘may have iron volcanoes’

Yuichi Tsuda, the mission’s project manager, had earlier explained: “We expect the impact accuracy [of the SCI] to be something like a 200m radius, it’s very large… we expect to have a hole somewhere in that very big region.

“We will try to find that artificial crater two weeks later, by descending to a lower altitude and making extensive observations.”

A video of the SCI being tested on Earth can be seen below:

Skip Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Warning: Third party content may contain adverts

Report

End of Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Ryugu belongs to a particularly primitive type of space rock known as a C-type asteroid. It’s a relic left over from the early days of our Solar System.

But bombardment with cosmic radiation over the aeons is thought to alter the surfaces of these planetary building blocks. So, scientists want to get at a fresh sample that hasn’t been changed by this process.

Speaking at last month’s 50th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), project scientist Sei-ichiro Watanabe said the experiment would also “provide us with information of the strength of the surface layer of Ryugu”.

This could help shed light on how the asteroid developed its characteristic “spinning top” shape.

test

The Japanese Hayabusa-2 spacecraft is thought to have detonated an explosive charge on the asteroid it is exploring.

Its mission is to create an artificial crater on the asteroid Ryugu.

If this is successful, it will later return to gather samples of the asteroid, which could help scientists understand how earth was formed in the early solar system.

According to Kyodo News, the experiment’s success will only be confirmed in late April.

The explosive device, called the Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI), was deployed by the Hayabusa-2 on Friday. The SCI is a 14kg conical container attached to the Hayabusa-2 and packed with plastic explosive.

It was intended to punch a 10m-wide hole in the asteroid upon impact.

The SCI on Friday successfully separated from the Hayabusa-2 at an altitude of 500m above the surface of Ryugu.

In the meantime, the Hayabusa-2 manoeuvred itself to hide away on the other side of the asteroid, shielding the spacecraft from any flying debris.

If the detonation is successful, images of the moment it happened should be captured by a small camera called DCAM3, which was deployed by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa).

The camera is meant to observe the explosion from a distance of about 1km and capture images of the projectile explosion back to its “mothership”.

However, it is unclear how long it would take for these images to be transmitted back to Earth.

If all goes to plan, Hayabusa-2 will in a few weeks return to the crater to collect pristine samples of the asteroid that have not been exposed to the harsh environment of space.

These samples are expected to reveal vital data to help explain how planets were formed in the early period of the solar system.

  • Movie shows moment of asteroid landing
  • Asteroid mission exploring a ‘rubble pile’
  • Metal world ‘may have iron volcanoes’

Yuichi Tsuda, the mission’s project manager, had earlier explained: “We expect the impact accuracy [of the SCI] to be something like a 200m radius, it’s very large… we expect to have a hole somewhere in that very big region.

“We will try to find that artificial crater two weeks later, by descending to a lower altitude and making extensive observations.”

A video of the SCI being tested on Earth can be seen below:

Skip Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Warning: Third party content may contain adverts

Report

End of Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Ryugu belongs to a particularly primitive type of space rock known as a C-type asteroid. It’s a relic left over from the early days of our Solar System.

But bombardment with cosmic radiation over the aeons is thought to alter the surfaces of these planetary building blocks. So, scientists want to get at a fresh sample that hasn’t been changed by this process.

Speaking at last month’s 50th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), project scientist Sei-ichiro Watanabe said the experiment would also “provide us with information of the strength of the surface layer of Ryugu”.

This could help shed light on how the asteroid developed its characteristic “spinning top” shape.

test

The Japanese Hayabusa-2 spacecraft is thought to have detonated an explosive charge on the asteroid it is exploring.

Its mission is to create an artificial crater on the asteroid Ryugu.

If this is successful, it will later return to gather samples of the asteroid, which could help scientists understand how earth was formed in the early solar system.

According to Kyodo News, the experiment’s success will only be confirmed in late April.

The explosive device, called the Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI), was deployed by the Hayabusa-2 on Friday. The SCI is a 14kg conical container attached to the Hayabusa-2 and packed with plastic explosive.

It was intended to punch a 10m-wide hole in the asteroid upon impact.

The SCI on Friday successfully separated from the Hayabusa-2 at an altitude of 500m above the surface of Ryugu.

In the meantime, the Hayabusa-2 manoeuvred itself to hide away on the other side of the asteroid, shielding the spacecraft from any flying debris.

If the detonation is successful, images of the moment it happened should be captured by a small camera called DCAM3, which was deployed by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa).

The camera is meant to observe the explosion from a distance of about 1km and capture images of the projectile explosion back to its “mothership”.

However, it is unclear how long it would take for these images to be transmitted back to Earth.

If all goes to plan, Hayabusa-2 will in a few weeks return to the crater to collect pristine samples of the asteroid that have not been exposed to the harsh environment of space.

These samples are expected to reveal vital data to help explain how planets were formed in the early period of the solar system.

  • Movie shows moment of asteroid landing
  • Asteroid mission exploring a ‘rubble pile’
  • Metal world ‘may have iron volcanoes’

Yuichi Tsuda, the mission’s project manager, had earlier explained: “We expect the impact accuracy [of the SCI] to be something like a 200m radius, it’s very large… we expect to have a hole somewhere in that very big region.

“We will try to find that artificial crater two weeks later, by descending to a lower altitude and making extensive observations.”

A video of the SCI being tested on Earth can be seen below:

Skip Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Warning: Third party content may contain adverts

Report

End of Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Ryugu belongs to a particularly primitive type of space rock known as a C-type asteroid. It’s a relic left over from the early days of our Solar System.

But bombardment with cosmic radiation over the aeons is thought to alter the surfaces of these planetary building blocks. So, scientists want to get at a fresh sample that hasn’t been changed by this process.

Speaking at last month’s 50th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), project scientist Sei-ichiro Watanabe said the experiment would also “provide us with information of the strength of the surface layer of Ryugu”.

This could help shed light on how the asteroid developed its characteristic “spinning top” shape.

test

The Japanese Hayabusa-2 spacecraft is thought to have detonated an explosive charge on the asteroid it is exploring.

Its mission is to create an artificial crater on the asteroid Ryugu.

If this is successful, it will later return to gather samples of the asteroid, which could help scientists understand how earth was formed in the early solar system.

According to Kyodo News, the experiment’s success will only be confirmed in late April.

The explosive device, called the Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI), was deployed by the Hayabusa-2 on Friday. The SCI is a 14kg conical container attached to the Hayabusa-2 and packed with plastic explosive.

It was intended to punch a 10m-wide hole in the asteroid upon impact.

The SCI on Friday successfully separated from the Hayabusa-2 at an altitude of 500m above the surface of Ryugu.

In the meantime, the Hayabusa-2 manoeuvred itself to hide away on the other side of the asteroid, shielding the spacecraft from any flying debris.

If the detonation is successful, images of the moment it happened should be captured by a small camera called DCAM3, which was deployed by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa).

The camera is meant to observe the explosion from a distance of about 1km and capture images of the projectile explosion back to its “mothership”.

However, it is unclear how long it would take for these images to be transmitted back to Earth.

If all goes to plan, Hayabusa-2 will in a few weeks return to the crater to collect pristine samples of the asteroid that have not been exposed to the harsh environment of space.

These samples are expected to reveal vital data to help explain how planets were formed in the early period of the solar system.

  • Movie shows moment of asteroid landing
  • Asteroid mission exploring a ‘rubble pile’
  • Metal world ‘may have iron volcanoes’

Yuichi Tsuda, the mission’s project manager, had earlier explained: “We expect the impact accuracy [of the SCI] to be something like a 200m radius, it’s very large… we expect to have a hole somewhere in that very big region.

“We will try to find that artificial crater two weeks later, by descending to a lower altitude and making extensive observations.”

A video of the SCI being tested on Earth can be seen below:

Skip Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Warning: Third party content may contain adverts

Report

End of Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Ryugu belongs to a particularly primitive type of space rock known as a C-type asteroid. It’s a relic left over from the early days of our Solar System.

But bombardment with cosmic radiation over the aeons is thought to alter the surfaces of these planetary building blocks. So, scientists want to get at a fresh sample that hasn’t been changed by this process.

Speaking at last month’s 50th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), project scientist Sei-ichiro Watanabe said the experiment would also “provide us with information of the strength of the surface layer of Ryugu”.

This could help shed light on how the asteroid developed its characteristic “spinning top” shape.

test

The Japanese Hayabusa-2 spacecraft is thought to have detonated an explosive charge on the asteroid it is exploring.

Its mission is to create an artificial crater on the asteroid Ryugu.

If this is successful, it will later return to gather samples of the asteroid, which could help scientists understand how earth was formed in the early solar system.

According to Kyodo News, the experiment’s success will only be confirmed in late April.

The explosive device, called the Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI), was deployed by the Hayabusa-2 on Friday. The SCI is a 14kg conical container attached to the Hayabusa-2 and packed with plastic explosive.

It was intended to punch a 10m-wide hole in the asteroid upon impact.

The SCI on Friday successfully separated from the Hayabusa-2 at an altitude of 500m above the surface of Ryugu.

In the meantime, the Hayabusa-2 manoeuvred itself to hide away on the other side of the asteroid, shielding the spacecraft from any flying debris.

If the detonation is successful, images of the moment it happened should be captured by a small camera called DCAM3, which was deployed by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa).

The camera is meant to observe the explosion from a distance of about 1km and capture images of the projectile explosion back to its “mothership”.

However, it is unclear how long it would take for these images to be transmitted back to Earth.

If all goes to plan, Hayabusa-2 will in a few weeks return to the crater to collect pristine samples of the asteroid that have not been exposed to the harsh environment of space.

These samples are expected to reveal vital data to help explain how planets were formed in the early period of the solar system.

  • Movie shows moment of asteroid landing
  • Asteroid mission exploring a ‘rubble pile’
  • Metal world ‘may have iron volcanoes’

Yuichi Tsuda, the mission’s project manager, had earlier explained: “We expect the impact accuracy [of the SCI] to be something like a 200m radius, it’s very large… we expect to have a hole somewhere in that very big region.

“We will try to find that artificial crater two weeks later, by descending to a lower altitude and making extensive observations.”

A video of the SCI being tested on Earth can be seen below:

Skip Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Warning: Third party content may contain adverts

Report

End of Youtube post by The Planetary Society

Ryugu belongs to a particularly primitive type of space rock known as a C-type asteroid. It’s a relic left over from the early days of our Solar System.

But bombardment with cosmic radiation over the aeons is thought to alter the surfaces of these planetary building blocks. So, scientists want to get at a fresh sample that hasn’t been changed by this process.

Speaking at last month’s 50th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), project scientist Sei-ichiro Watanabe said the experiment would also “provide us with information of the strength of the surface layer of Ryugu”.

This could help shed light on how the asteroid developed its characteristic “spinning top” shape.

Những tiện ích bể bơi cung thể thao dưới nước mỹ đình mang lại

Mỹ Đình được coi là bể bơi khu liên hợp thể thao Quốc Gia, nó nằm ở quận Nam Từ Liêm Hà Nội và là một khu quần thể có bể bơi rộng lớn nhất Việt Nam. Hay cùng chúng tôi khám phá bể bơi cung thể thao dưới nước mỹ đình được đông đảo người ưa chuộng này.

1.Vài nét về bể bơi cung thể thao dưới nước

Trong khuôn viên của bể bơi cung thể thao dưới nước này hiện có tổng số 4 bể bơi, 2 bể bơi trong nhà và 2 bể bơi bên ngoài. Cơ sở vật chất cấu tạo nên hồ bơi này đủ điều kiện đạt chuẩn về quy cách tiêu chuẩn cả về không gian và cách tổ chức cho các giải thi đấu về môn bơi.

Bài viết xem thêm > F18 – Máy chấm công Ronald Jack hàng đầu cho văn phòng cao cấp

Bên cạnh đó, trang thiết bị và hệ thống cấp thoát nước tự động cũng được ứng dụng để đảm bảo cho nước hồ luôn sạch sẽ, thân thiện với môi trường. Ngoài ra, những dịch vụ ở đây cung cấp cũng được đánh giá rất uy tín, những học viên luyện tập ở đây đa phần trở thành chuyên gia hàng đầu sau một thời gian học.

Có 1 điểm đặc biệt có thể nhiều người chưa biết đó là bể bơi cung thể thao này nằm trong liên đoàn bóng đá việt nam nên có rất nhiều vận động viên bóng đá cũng thường bơi ở đây. Bể bơi này được đặt trên tầng 2 của tòa nhà liên đoàn (điểm này khá thú vị).

Cung bể bơi thể thao dưới nước luôn áp dụng những công nghệ bể bơi mới nhất, bạn có thể tham khảo thêm Hệ thống lọc thông minh của chúng tôi

2.Bể bơi Mỹ Đình có dạy bơi cho trẻ em không?

Phải công nhận phương pháp dạy ở đây rất hiệu quả, có thể giúp được rất nhiều trẻ em tránh được tình trạng đuối nước. Ngoài ra nhiều học viên còn trở thành những tài năng bơi lội cho quốc gia, chính những cách áp dụng tốt phương pháp của cung thể thao dưới nước Mỹ Đình đã thu hút được đông đảo bậc phụ huynh cho con nhỏ đến đây học bơi.

Theo thống kê năm 2017, có hơn 1 ngàn trẻ nhỏ ở Thủ Đô và khắp cả nước đã học bơi tại đây, quả là một điểm đáng mừng cho mỗi gia đình và cả đất nước. Vì đây là 1 môn thể thao bơi lội rất hữu ích cho chiều cao của trẻ.

3.Giá vé bể bơi cung thể thao dưới nước

Giá vé cho những người bơi lượt ở đây cũng khá cao, vì bể bơi được tích hợp rât snhieeuf công nghệ hiện đại. Xét về cơ sở vật chất thì hồ bơi này đã đạt được chất lượng rất tốt ở Việt Nam, mức giá bơi cho người lớn là 80.000 đồng/lượt, trẻ em là 60.000/lượt.

Nếu bạn muốn lựa chọn địa điểm đi bơi thì đây đúng là điểm đến lý tưởng. Bể bơi cung thể thao dưới nước mỹ đình có hệ thống mái vòm che mưa che nắng quanh năm nên bất kể mùa nào cũng đều mở cửa phục vụ quý khách được.
Xem thêm thật nhiều bài viết hay tại https://wikisohoa.com